Document Detail


Superstition: a matter of bias, not detectability.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17569494     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Pigeons discriminated between stimulus changes dependent on their pecking and stimulus changes occurring independently of their behavior. Their performance was accurate, and when the payoffs for "hits" and "correct rejections" were varied, their response bias varied in a fashion similar to that of human observers detecting signals in a background of noise.
Authors:
P R Killeen
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Science (New York, N.Y.)     Volume:  199     ISSN:  0036-8075     ISO Abbreviation:  Science     Publication Date:  1978 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2007-06-15     Completed Date:  2007-07-12     Revised Date:  2014-03-25    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0404511     Medline TA:  Science     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  88-90     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Behavior, Animal*
Columbidae*
Discrimination (Psychology)*
Food
Motivation
Probability
ROC Curve
Reinforcement (Psychology)
Reward
Stereotyped Behavior
Superstitions*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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