Document Detail


Successful Staged Surgical Repair Using Rapid Pulmonary Artery Banding in a Very-Low-Birth-Weight Premature Infant Who Had d-Transposition of the Great Arteries With an Intact Ventricular Septum.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22903681     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The arterial switch operation is the surgical correction of choice for patients born with d-transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA) and an intact ventricular septum. However, prematurity and very low birth weight present both technical and physiologic challenges to this approach. Furthermore, in the setting of d-TGA and an intact ventricular septum, delaying intervention results in deconditioning of the left ventricle, rendering the patient a poor candidate for the arterial switch operation. The report presents an infant born at 27 weeks gestation weighing 1.01 kg who as a newborn underwent a successful urgent balloon atrial septostomy, pulmonary artery banding, and a central shunt on day of life (DOL) 82 and the arterial switch operation on DOL 93.
Authors:
Rodrigo Rios; Kirsten B Dummer; David M Overman
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-8-18
Journal Detail:
Title:  Pediatric cardiology     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1432-1971     ISO Abbreviation:  Pediatr Cardiol     Publication Date:  2012 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-8-20     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8003849     Medline TA:  Pediatr Cardiol     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Division of Cardiology, The Children's Heart Clinic, Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
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