Document Detail


Substance use and the risk for sexual intercourse with and without a history of teenage pregnancy among adolescent females.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21388592     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: The present study examined the associations between initiation and intensity of substance use and with sexual experience with and without a history of teenage pregnancy.
METHOD: Participants were high school females (weighted n = 3,451) who participated in the 1999-2003 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, a cross-sectional, nationally representative survey. Multinomial multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the likelihood of being sexually experienced (but never pregnant) and teenage pregnancy (reference group: never had sexual intercourse) as a function of age at substance use initiation (i.e., age 12 or younger, 13-14 years of age, and age 15 or older) and intensity of substance use (i.e., nonuser, experimental/ new or nondaily, nonexperimental/daily user) for alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana, while controlling for race/ethnicity, metropolitan location, symptoms of depression, and illegal drug availability at school.
RESULTS: A major finding of our study is that substance use behaviors across each substance (alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana) independently contributed to an increased risk in sexual intercourse experience with and without a history of teenage pregnancy (vs. nonsexually experienced females). A dose-response relationship was also observed between an increased likelihood of a teenage pregnancy and marijuana behaviors. Furthermore, the risk for teenage pregnancy was compounded for daily cigarette smokers who initiated use at age 12 or younger.
CONCLUSIONS: Screening substance use behaviors can help to identify girls who may benefit from pregnancy prevention strategies. Targeting cigarette and marijuana behaviors as early as age 12 or younger may provide an added benefit. Prevention strategies should also consider the role of race above and beyond substance use behaviors.
Authors:
Patricia A Cavazos-Rehg; Melissa J Krauss; Edward L Spitznagel; Mario Schootman; Linda B Cottler; Laura Jean Bierut
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs     Volume:  72     ISSN:  1938-4114     ISO Abbreviation:  J Stud Alcohol Drugs     Publication Date:  2011 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-03-10     Completed Date:  2011-10-03     Revised Date:  2013-06-30    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101295847     Medline TA:  J Stud Alcohol Drugs     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  194-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University, 660 South Euclid, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. rehgp@psychiatry.wustl.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior / ethnology
Alcohol Drinking / psychology*
Coitus / psychology*
Female
Humans
Marijuana Smoking / psychology*
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence / ethnology,  psychology*,  statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Risk Factors
Risk-Taking
Schools
Sexual Behavior / ethnology,  psychology*,  statistics & numerical data
Smoking / psychology*
Students
Substance-Related Disorders / psychology*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
K01DA025733/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; K02 DA021237/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; K02DA021237/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; KL2 RR024994/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; T32 DA07313/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; UL1 RR024992/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; UL1 RR024992/RR/NCRR NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

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