Document Detail


Structural racism and myocardial infarction in the United States.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  24507909     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
There is a growing research literature suggesting that racism is an important risk factor undermining the health of Blacks in the United States. Racism can take many forms, ranging from interpersonal interactions to institutional/structural conditions and practices. Existing research, however, tends to focus on individual forms of racial discrimination using self-report measures. Far less attention has been paid to whether structural racism may disadvantage the health of Blacks in the United States. The current study addresses gaps in the existing research by using novel measures of structural racism and by explicitly testing the hypothesis that structural racism is a risk factor for myocardial infarction among Blacks in the United States. State-level indicators of structural racism included four domains: (1) political participation; (2) employment and job status; (3) educational attainment; and (4) judicial treatment. State-level racial disparities across these domains were proposed to represent the systematic exclusion of Blacks from resources and mobility in society. Data on past-year myocardial infarction were obtained from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (non-Hispanic Black: N = 8245; non-Hispanic White: N = 24,507), a nationally representative survey of the U.S. civilian, non-institutionalized population aged 18 and older. Models were adjusted for individual-level confounders (age, sex, education, household income, medical insurance) as well as for state-level disparities in poverty. Results indicated that Blacks living in states with high levels of structural racism were generally more likely to report past-year myocardial infarction than Blacks living in low-structural racism states. Conversely, Whites living in high structural racism states experienced null or lower odds of myocardial infarction compared to Whites living in low-structural racism states. These results raise the provocative possibility that structural racism may not only harm the targets of stigma but also benefit those who wield the power to enact stigma and discrimination.
Authors:
Alicia Lukachko; Mark L Hatzenbuehler; Katherine M Keyes
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Social science & medicine (1982)     Volume:  103     ISSN:  1873-5347     ISO Abbreviation:  Soc Sci Med     Publication Date:  2014 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2014-02-10     Completed Date:  2014-04-01     Revised Date:  2014-08-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8303205     Medline TA:  Soc Sci Med     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  42-50     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
African Americans / statistics & numerical data*
European Continental Ancestry Group / statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Status Disparities*
Humans
Male
Myocardial Infarction / ethnology*
Racism*
Risk Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
5-T32-MH 13043/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; DA 032558/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; K01 DA032558/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R21 AA021909/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS; T32 MH013043/MH/NIMH NIH HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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