Document Detail


Stressful life events and smoking were associated with Graves' disease in women, but not in men.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  9560867     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: Although psychological stress and smoking have been proposed as contributing factors to Graves' disease, their independent roles in the pathogenesis of this disease have not been determined. We assessed the association between Graves' disease and psychological stress and smoking by using multivariate analysis. METHODS: By a matched case-control method, we investigated the association between Graves' disease and stressful life events, daily hassles, smoking, drinking habits, coping skills, and social support in 228 patients (182 women and 46 men) with newly diagnosed Graves' disease; we used the conditional maximum likelihood method. RESULTS: After data were adjusted for daily hassles, smoking, drinking habits, social support, and coping skills, we found that stressful life events were significantly associated with the risk of Graves' disease in women. The relative risk was 7.7 for women with the highest stress score compared with women with the lowest stress score (95% confidence interval, 2.2 to 27, p for trend < .001). Smoking was also independently associated with the risk of Graves' disease in women. The relative risk for women with the highest number group compared with women with the lowest number group for smoking cigarettes was 5.1 (95% confidence interval, 1.0 to 27; p for trend < .001). These factors were not significantly associated with Graves' disease in men. CONCLUSIONS: Psychological stress and smoking were associated with Graves' disease in women, but not in men.
Authors:
K Yoshiuchi; H Kumano; S Nomura; H Yoshimura; K Ito; Y Kanaji; Y Ohashi; T Kuboki; H Suematsu
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Psychosomatic medicine     Volume:  60     ISSN:  0033-3174     ISO Abbreviation:  Psychosom Med     Publication Date:    1998 Mar-Apr
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1998-07-14     Completed Date:  1998-07-14     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376505     Medline TA:  Psychosom Med     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  182-5     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Japan.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Alcohol Drinking / epidemiology
Confidence Intervals
Female
Graves Disease / epidemiology*,  psychology
Humans
Japan / epidemiology
Life Change Events*
Likelihood Functions
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
Sex Factors
Smoking / epidemiology*,  psychology
Stress, Psychological / epidemiology*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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