Document Detail


Stress training for the surgical resident.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23331982     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Much effort in surgical education is placed on the development of clinical judgment and technical proficiency. However, little focus is placed on the management of stress associated with surgical performance. The inability to manage stress may lead to poor patient care, attrition from residency, and surgeon burnout.
METHODS: A blinded, matched, comparison group study to evaluate the efficacy of an educational program designed to improve surgical resident performance during stressful scenarios was conducted. The experimental group (n = 11) participated in stress training sessions, whereas the control group (n = 15) did not. Both groups then completed a simulation during which stress was evaluated using objective and subjective measures, and resident performance was graded using a standardized checklist.
RESULTS: Performance checklist scores were 5% higher in the experimental group than the control group (P = .54). No change existed in anxiety state according to the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (P = .34) or in heart rate under stress (P = .17) between groups.
CONCLUSIONS: There was a trend toward improved performance scoring but no difference in anxiety levels after stress training. However, 91% of residents rated the stress training as valuable.
Authors:
Zoë Maher; Richard Milner; Jane Cripe; John Gaughan; Joel Fish; Amy J Goldberg
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  American journal of surgery     Volume:  205     ISSN:  1879-1883     ISO Abbreviation:  Am. J. Surg.     Publication Date:  2013 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-01-21     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0370473     Medline TA:  Am J Surg     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  169-74     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, Parkinson Pavilion, 3401 North Broad Street, 4th Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA. Electronic address: Zoe.maher@tuhs.temple.edu.
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