Document Detail


Stent flexibility versus concertina effect: Mechanism of an unpleasant trade-off in stent design and its implications for stent selection in the cath-lab.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23084111     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The "concertina effect", longitudinal deformation of the proximal segments of a deployed stent when force is applied from a guide catheter or other equipment, is a recently recognised problem which seems to particularly affect more recent stent designs. Until now, flexibility and deliverability have been paramount aims in stent design. Developments have focussed on optimising these features which are commonly evaluated by clinicians and demanded by regulatory bodies. Contemporary stent designs now provide high flexibility by reducing the number of connecting links between stent segments and by allowing the connecting links to easily change their length. These design evolutions may, however, simultaneously reduce longitudinal strength and have the unintended effect of inducing some risk of longitudinal compression of the stent (the "concertina effect") during difficult clinical cases. Progress in stent design and elimination of restenosis by drug coating has improved PCI outcome and enabled new applications. Here we discuss design trade-offs that shaped evolution and improvement in stent design, from early bare metal designs to the latest generation of drug eluting stent (DES) platforms. Longitudinal strength was not recognised as a critical parameter by clinicians or regulators until recently. Measurements, only now becoming publically available, seem to confirm vulnerability of some modern designs to longitudinal deformation. Clinicians could be more guarded in their assumption that changes in technology are beneficial in all clinical situations. Sometimes a silent trade-off may have taken place, adopting choices that are favourable for the vast majority of patients but exposing a few patients to unintended hazard.
Authors:
N Foin; C Di Mario; D P Francis; J E Davies
Publication Detail:
Type:  EDITORIAL     Date:  2012-10-18
Journal Detail:
Title:  International journal of cardiology     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1874-1754     ISO Abbreviation:  Int. J. Cardiol.     Publication Date:  2012 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-10-22     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8200291     Medline TA:  Int J Cardiol     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
International Centre for Circulatory Health, Imperial College London, UK. Electronic address: nicolas.foin@gmail.com.
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