Document Detail


Stable nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios indicate traditional and market food intake in an indigenous circumpolar population.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22157543     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The transition of a society from traditional to market-based diets (termed the nutrition transition) has been associated with profound changes in culture and health. We are developing biomarkers to track the nutrition transition in the Yup'ik Eskimo population of Southwest Alaska based on naturally occurring variations in the relative abundances of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes (δ(15)N and δ(13)C values). Here, we provide three pieces of evidence toward the validation of these biomarkers. First, we analyzed the δ(15)N and δ(13)C values of a comprehensive sample of Yup'ik foods. We found that δ(15)N values were elevated in fish and marine mammals and that δ(13)C values were elevated in market foods containing corn or sugar cane carbon. Second, we evaluated the associations between RBC δ(15)N and δ(13)C values and self-reported measures of traditional and market food intake (n = 230). RBC δ(15)N values were correlated with intake of fish and marine mammals (r = 0.52; P < 0.0001). RBC δ(13)C values were correlated with intake of market foods made from corn and sugar cane (r = 0.46; P < 0.0001) and total market food intake (r = 0.46; P < 0.0001). Finally, we assessed whether stable isotope ratios captured population-level patterns of traditional and market intake (n = 1003). Isotopic biomarkers of traditional and market intake were associated with age, community location, sex, and cultural identity. Self-report methods showed variations by age and cultural identity only. Thus, stable isotopes show potential as biomarkers for monitoring dietary change in indigenous circumpolar populations.
Authors:
Sarah H Nash; Andrea Bersamin; Alan R Kristal; Scarlett E Hopkins; Rebecca S Church; Renee L Pasker; Bret R Luick; Gerald V Mohatt; Bert B Boyer; Diane M O'Brien
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2011-12-07
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Journal of nutrition     Volume:  142     ISSN:  1541-6100     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Nutr.     Publication Date:  2012 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-12-21     Completed Date:  2012-02-13     Revised Date:  2013-10-23    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0404243     Medline TA:  J Nutr     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  84-90     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Center for Alaska Native Health Research, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Carbon Isotopes / metabolism*
Diet*
Humans
Inuits
Nitrogen Isotopes / metabolism*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
P20 RR016430/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; P20 RR16430-10/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; P30 CA015704/CA/NCI NIH HHS; R01 DK074842/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; R01DK07442/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Carbon Isotopes; 0/Nitrogen Isotopes
Comments/Corrections

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