Document Detail


Squash ball mechanics and implications for play.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  3698160     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The purpose of this research was to examine how temperature and velocity affect coefficient of restitution and how temperature affects the force-deformation properties of balls used in the international game of squash. The balls used were the international yellow dot and a newly developed double yellow dot. Coefficient of restitution increased with temperature and decreased with increases in projection velocity. The effect of temperature was most marked at low projection velocities. Coefficient of restitution was smallest for the double yellow dot ball but differences between balls decreased with increases in both temperature and projection velocity. Static tests showed increasing ball stiffness with increases in both force applied and temperature, and the yellow dot ball showed the greatest stiffness. Static tests indicated that standards published by the Canadian Squash Racquets Association are inappropriate. These results are discussed in the contexts of play and testing and design criteria for the balls.
Authors:
A E Chapman; R N Zuyderhoff
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Canadian journal of applied sport sciences. Journal canadien des sciences appliquées au sport     Volume:  11     ISSN:  0700-3978     ISO Abbreviation:  Can J Appl Sport Sci     Publication Date:  1986 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1986-05-27     Completed Date:  1986-05-27     Revised Date:  2008-02-26    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7801184     Medline TA:  Can J Appl Sport Sci     Country:  CANADA    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  47-54     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Humans
Physical Education and Training*
Sports*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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