Document Detail


Spinal growth modulation using a novel intravertebral epiphyseal device in an immature porcine model.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21858726     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
PURPOSE: Fusionless growth modulation is an attractive alternative to conventional treatments of idiopathic scoliosis. To date, fusionless devices achieve unilateral growth modulation by compressing the intervertebral disc. This study explores a device to control spinal alignment and vertebral morphology via growth modulation while excluding the disc in a porcine model.
METHODS: A device that locally encloses the vertebral growth plate exclusive of the disc was introduced anteriorly over T5-T8 in four immature pigs (experimental) while three underwent surgery without instrumentation (sham) and two were selected as controls. Bi-weekly coronal and lateral radiographs were taken over the 12-week follow-up to document vertebral morphology and spinal alignment modifications via an inverse approach (creation of deformity).
RESULTS: All animals completed the experiment with no postoperative complications. Control and sham groups showed no significant changes in spinal alignment. Experimental group achieved a final coronal Cobb angle of 6.5° ± 3.5° (constrained to the four instrumented levels) and no alteration to the sagittal profile was observed. Solely the experimental group ended with consistent vertebral wedging of 4.1° ± 3.6° amounting to a cumulative wedging of up to 25° and a concurring difference in left/right vertebral height of 1.24 ± 1.86 mm in the coronal plane.
CONCLUSIONS: The proposed intravertebral epiphyseal device, for the early treatment of progressive idiopathic scoliosis, demonstrated its feasibility by manipulating spinal alignment through the realization of local growth modulation exclusive of the intervertebral disc.
Authors:
Mark Driscoll; Carl-Eric Aubin; Alain Moreau; Yaroslav Wakula; John F Sarwark; Stefan Parent
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Validation Studies     Date:  2011-08-21
Journal Detail:
Title:  European spine journal : official publication of the European Spine Society, the European Spinal Deformity Society, and the European Section of the Cervical Spine Research Society     Volume:  21     ISSN:  1432-0932     ISO Abbreviation:  Eur Spine J     Publication Date:  2012 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-01-06     Completed Date:  2012-09-24     Revised Date:  2013-06-27    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9301980     Medline TA:  Eur Spine J     Country:  Germany    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  138-44     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Mechanical Engineering Department, École Polytechnique de Montréal, P.O. Box 6079, Station Centre-ville', Montreal, QC, H3C 3A7, Canada.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Epiphyses / anatomy & histology,  physiology,  surgery*
Feasibility Studies
Female
Intervertebral Disc / growth & development,  surgery
Models, Animal*
Orthopedic Procedures / instrumentation*,  methods*
Scoliosis / physiopathology,  surgery
Spine / anatomy & histology,  growth & development*,  surgery*
Sus scrofa
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From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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