Document Detail


Slug tests in the presence of background head trends.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20456502     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
We extend Bouwer and Rice (1976) slug test theory to incorporate background head trends that may be important in incompressible material of low permeability k. The extension, which features a convolution integral of the background head, is closed form for linear trends. A sensitivity study suggests that a rising background head can diminish the head changes associated with a slug-out test and underestimate k if it is ignored, as does falling background trend with a slug-in test. A falling background head can reinforce slug-in test head change and, if ignored, can overestimate k, as does a rising background head with a slug-out test. The simple extension is verified by field tests in glacial till and stratified drift deposits in eastern Massachusetts.
Authors:
David W Ostendorf; Don J DeGroot
Publication Detail:
Type:  Evaluation Studies; Journal Article     Date:  2010-04-26
Journal Detail:
Title:  Ground water     Volume:  48     ISSN:  1745-6584     ISO Abbreviation:  Ground Water     Publication Date:    2010 Jul-Aug
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-07-20     Completed Date:  2010-11-03     Revised Date:  2011-01-07    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9882886     Medline TA:  Ground Water     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  609-13     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003, USA.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Earth Sciences / methods*
Fresh Water*
Geological Phenomena
Massachusetts
Water Supply*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Mobilization of metals from uranium mine waste: the role of pyoverdines produced by Pseudomonas fluo...
Next Document:  In-well degassing issues for measurements of dissolved gases in groundwater.