Document Detail


Sleep spindle activity is associated with the integration of new memories and existing knowledge.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20980591     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Sleep spindle activity has been associated with improvements in procedural and declarative memory. Here, for the first time, we looked at the role of spindles in the integration of newly learned information with existing knowledge, contrasting this with explicit recall of the new information. Two groups of participants learned novel spoken words (e.g., cathedruke) that overlapped phonologically with familiar words (e.g., cathedral). The sleep group was exposed to the novel words in the evening, followed by an initial test, a polysomnographically monitored night of sleep, and a second test in the morning. The wake group was exposed and initially tested in the morning and spent a retention interval of similar duration awake. Finally, both groups were tested a week later at the same circadian time to control for possible circadian effects. In the sleep group, participants recalled more words and recognized them faster after sleep, whereas in the wake group such changes were not observed until the final test 1 week later. Following acquisition of the novel words, recognition of the familiar words was slowed in both groups, but only after the retention interval, indicating that the novel words had been integrated into the mental lexicon following consolidation. Importantly, spindle activity was associated with overnight lexical integration in the sleep group, but not with gains in recall rate or recognition speed of the novel words themselves. Spindle activity appears to be particularly important for overnight integration of new memories with existing neocortical knowledge.
Authors:
Jakke Tamminen; Jessica D Payne; Robert Stickgold; Erin J Wamsley; M Gareth Gaskell
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience     Volume:  30     ISSN:  1529-2401     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Neurosci.     Publication Date:  2010 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-10-28     Completed Date:  2010-11-30     Revised Date:  2014-09-19    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8102140     Medline TA:  J Neurosci     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  14356-60     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Circadian Rhythm / physiology
Cues
Electroencephalography
Female
Humans
Knowledge*
Male
Memory / physiology*
Mental Recall / physiology
Neocortex / physiology
Polysomnography
Psychomotor Performance / physiology
Reaction Time / physiology
Reading
Sleep / physiology*
Sleep Stages / physiology
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
MH48832/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; R01 MH048832/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; R01 MH048832-16/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; R01 MH092638/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; T32-HL07901/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

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