Document Detail


Single photon emission computed tomography and apolipoprotein E in Alzheimer's disease: impact of the epsilon4 allele on regional cerebral blood flow.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  11281316     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The aim of this study was to examine the impact of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon4 allele on semiquantitative regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in Alzheimer's disease. Single photon emission computed tomography technetium (SPECT) with (99m)Tc d,l-hexamethyl propylenamine oxine was used to determine rCBF in 41 consecutive patients (18 males/23 females) with probable Alzheimer's disease according to the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke-Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association criteria (mean age 71.0 years; range 54-85). The mean Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score was 20.4 (range 10-30). After normalization of CBF to mean blood flow in the cerebellum, values for rCBF in several cortical regions of interest, side-to-side asymmetry indices, and anterior-posterior ratios were calculated. Determination of the APOE genotype from blood samples was performed using restriction enzyme polymerase chain reaction technique. Multivariate regression analyses and the Wilcoxon rank-sum test for unpaired data (Mann-Whitney) were used for statistical analysis. The patients comprised 27APOE epsilon4-positive and 14APOE epsilon4-negative individuals. Five patients were APOE epsilon4 homozygotes. APOE epsilon4-positive patients had significantly reduced rCBF in the right frontal and left occipital lobes. On nonparametric analysis, the most prominent differences between epsilon4-negative and epsilon4-positive patients were demonstrated in subregions representing the frontal association cortex (Mann-Whitney, P < .01). Age-stratified analysis suggested that these findings could be demonstrated predominantly in the elderly patients. The results of this study suggest that the APOE genotype in itself may have an impact on the pattern of rCBF deficits in Alzheimer's disease. The more pronounced reduction of rCBF in frontal association cortex observed in elderly APOE epsilon4-positive patients might predict clinical progression.
Authors:
P Høgh; G M Knudsen; K H Kjaer; O S Jørgensen; O B Paulson; G Waldemar
Related Documents :
18479766 - Hyperhomocysteinemia and alzheimer's disease: a systematic review.
7114816 - Kuru with incubation periods exceeding two decades.
401446 - The physical and behavioural complex of dementia.
8156086 - Dementia accompanying motor neuron disease.
19560226 - Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with chronic plaque psoriasis.
8698016 - Ten years experience with chronic prostatitis in africans.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of geriatric psychiatry and neurology     Volume:  14     ISSN:  0891-9887     ISO Abbreviation:  J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol     Publication Date:  2001  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2001-04-02     Completed Date:  2001-07-12     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8805645     Medline TA:  J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol     Country:  Canada    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  42-51     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Memory Disorders Research Unit, The Neuroscience Center, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Denmark.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alleles
Alzheimer Disease / genetics*,  physiopathology
Apolipoprotein E4
Apolipoproteins E / genetics*
Brain / blood supply*,  radionuclide imaging
Case-Control Studies
Cerebrovascular Circulation / genetics*
Dominance, Cerebral / genetics*
Female
Frontal Lobe / blood supply
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occipital Lobe / blood supply
Prognosis
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon*
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Apolipoprotein E4; 0/Apolipoproteins E

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Feasibility and effectiveness of treatments for post-stroke depression in elderly inpatients: system...
Next Document:  Anxiety and Alzheimer's disease.