Document Detail


Significance of silent myocardial ischemia after coronary artery bypass surgery.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  1442600     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The prevalence and prognostic significance of transient myocardial ischemia after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) were evaluated. In 3 studies, ischemia was found in an average of 24% of patients by ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring at 3-12 months after CABG. An average of 36% of patients in 3 other studies experienced ischemic ST-segment depression during exercise testing at 4-50 months after CABG. Of the ischemic episodes, 77% were silent during exercise testing. In the Coronary Artery Surgery Study (CASS) randomized patient subsets, survival at 12 years was significantly lower for patients who had either silent or symptomatic ischemia during exercise testing at 6 months after CABG compared with those who had no ischemia.
Authors:
D A Weiner
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The American journal of cardiology     Volume:  70     ISSN:  0002-9149     ISO Abbreviation:  Am. J. Cardiol.     Publication Date:  1992 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1992-12-18     Completed Date:  1992-12-18     Revised Date:  2005-11-16    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0207277     Medline TA:  Am J Cardiol     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  35F-38F     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Evans Memorial Department of Clinical Research, University Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02118.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Coronary Artery Bypass*
Humans
Myocardial Ischemia / physiopathology*
Postoperative Complications / physiopathology*
Prevalence
Prognosis

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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