Document Detail


Sexually transmitted infections among urban shelter clients.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  16773034     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) remain common in the United States. One contributor to this persistent problem is pockets of infection among persons who may not have regular access to health care, a group that includes those who seek services at shelters. OBJECTIVE: The goals of the study were to: 1) determine the acceptability of STI testing among individuals seeking services at shelters in 2 midsized southeastern cities; 2) evaluate the prevalence of chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, and HIV among these individuals; and 3) assess the proportion that subsequently learned their test results and received timely and appropriate treatment if warranted. STUDY DESIGN: Using a cross-sectional design, 430 individuals between the ages of 19 and 45 seen at 3 shelters in 2 cities were approached for participation. After completing a brief behavioral assessment, each participant provided a urine specimen for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) testing, blood for syphilis serologic testing, and an oral sample for HIV testing. RESULTS: The overall recruitment rate was 97% (96% in city A and 98% in city B). Seventy-eight percent were black with a mean age of 35.1 years. STI prevalence among those reporting sexual activity in the past 2 months was 12.9% in city A and 19.9% in city B (P = 0.04). The rate of CT in city B was significantly higher than city A (15.0% vs. 6.4%, P = 0.02); however, similar rates were found for GC (5.0% vs. 3.2%), primary and secondary syphilis (0.08% vs. 1.4%), and HIV (0.07% vs. 0.06%). Overall, 91.5% of the positive cases (89.0% in city A and 94.0% in city B) learned their test results and were successfully treated. CONCLUSION: We found that shelter clients were receptive to STI testing, even for HIV, with most positive cases notified and successfully treated.
Authors:
Diane M Grimley; Lucy Annang; Ivey Lewis; Rev William Smith; Immaculada Aban; Terry Hooks; Samantha Williams; Edward W Hook; Janet St Lawrence
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Multicenter Study    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Sexually transmitted diseases     Volume:  33     ISSN:  0148-5717     ISO Abbreviation:  Sex Transm Dis     Publication Date:  2006 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2006-10-24     Completed Date:  2006-11-28     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7705941     Medline TA:  Sex Transm Dis     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  666-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Health Behavior, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue S., Birmingham, AL 35294, USA. dgrimley@uab.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Alabama / epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Homeless Persons / statistics & numerical data*
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care / statistics & numerical data*
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sexually Transmitted Diseases / diagnosis,  epidemiology*,  prevention & control*
Urban Health

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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