Document Detail


Sex and estrous cycle differences in cocaine-induced approach-avoidance conflict.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21309954     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Human and animal research indicates that females may have a higher biological propensity for cocaine abuse than do males. Furthermore, reproductive status modulates the subjective effects of cocaine in women and self-administration rates in rats. Despite the attention that has been given to the modulation of appetitive responses by reproductive status and the well-known mixed positive and negative subjective effects of cocaine, it is unknown if similar effects are observed on aversive responses to cocaine. The present study examines the impact of sex and estrous cycle on approach-avoidance behavior for cocaine as measured in the runway self-administration model. Male and freely cycling female Sprague Dawley rats were trained to traverse a straight alley for single daily injections of 1.0 mg/kg intravenous cocaine over 21 trials. Relative to males, females had significantly longer start latencies but significantly faster approach and shorter run times during the first week of training. Further, estrus females displayed significantly fewer approach-avoidance retreats across all sessions relative to non-estrus females. These results suggest that females initially exhibit greater motivation for cocaine (faster approach) than do males and that the drug's anxiogenic properties have a reduced impact on the motivation to seek cocaine (fewer retreats) in females during the estrus phase relative to other reproductive phases. These findings indicate that both sex and reproductive status contribute to the motivation for cocaine and that sex differences in addiction vulnerability may be attributable in part to differences in the motivational impact of both the appetitive and aversive properties of cocaine.
Authors:
Kerry A Kerstetter; Zu-In Su; Aaron Ettenberg; Tod E Kippin
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2011-02-11
Journal Detail:
Title:  Addiction biology     Volume:  18     ISSN:  1369-1600     ISO Abbreviation:  Addict Biol     Publication Date:  2013 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-02-27     Completed Date:  2013-09-18     Revised Date:  2014-03-24    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9604935     Medline TA:  Addict Biol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  222-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
© 2011 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Cocaine / administration & dosage*,  pharmacology
Cocaine-Related Disorders
Conflict (Psychology)*
Disease Susceptibility
Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors / administration & dosage*,  pharmacology
Drug-Seeking Behavior / physiology*
Estrous Cycle / physiology*
Female
Humans
Male
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Reaction Time / physiology
Reinforcement (Psychology)
Self Administration
Sex Characteristics*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
DA027115/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; DA027525/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; DA05041/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01 DA005041/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01 DA027525/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R21 DA027115/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R56 DA005041/DA/NIDA NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors; I5Y540LHVR/Cocaine

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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