Document Detail


Sex-dependent role of the amygdala in the development of emotional and neuroendocrine reactivity to threatening stimuli in infant and juvenile rhesus monkeys.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23380162     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Amygdala dysfunction and abnormal fear and stress reactivity are common features of several developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. Yet, little is known about the exact role the amygdala plays in the development of threat detection and emotional modulation. The current study examined the effects of neonatal amygdala lesions on defensive, emotional, and neuroendocrine reactivity of infant rhesus monkeys reared with their mothers in large species-typical social groups. Monkeys received either bilateral MRI-guided ibotenic acid amygdala (Neo-A; n = 16) or sham (Neo-C; n = 12) lesions at 24.8 ± 1.2 days of age, or served as behavioral control (Neo-BC; n = 3). Defensive and emotional responses were assessed using the Human Intruder paradigm as infants and as juveniles (2.5 and 12 months of age, respectively), whereas neuroendocrine reactivity was only examined during the juvenile period. As infants, Neo-A animals expressed similar levels of freezing and hostile behaviors as compared to controls, whereas during the juvenile period Neo-A animals expressed significantly less freezing compared to controls. Interestingly, the sex of the infant modulated the behavioral effects of neonatal amygdalectomy, leading to different patterns of behavior depending on the sex and lesion status of the infant. Unlike controls, Neo-A infants did not modulate their behavioral responses based on the salience of the threat. The impact of neonatal amygdalectomy increased with age, such that Neo-A juveniles exhibited fewer emotional behaviors and increased cortisol response to the stressor as compared to controls. These data indicate that the amygdala plays a critical role in the development of both emotional and neuroendocrine reactivity as well as the expression of sexually dimorphic emotional expression.
Authors:
Jessica Raper; Kim Wallen; Mar M Sanchez; Shannon B Z Stephens; Amy Henry; Trina Villareal; Jocelyne Bachevalier
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.     Date:  2013-02-01
Journal Detail:
Title:  Hormones and behavior     Volume:  63     ISSN:  1095-6867     ISO Abbreviation:  Horm Behav     Publication Date:  2013 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-04-22     Completed Date:  2013-10-28     Revised Date:  2014-04-02    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0217764     Medline TA:  Horm Behav     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  646-58     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone / blood
Aging / psychology
Agonistic Behavior / physiology*
Amygdala / physiology*
Animals
Emotions / physiology*
Exploratory Behavior / physiology
Fear / psychology
Female
Humans
Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System / physiology
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Linear Models
Macaca mulatta
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Neurosecretory Systems / physiology*
Sex Characteristics
Social Isolation
Vocalization, Animal / physiology
Yawning / physiology
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
MH050268/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; NIMH T32 MH73525//PHS HHS; OD P51OD11132/OD/NIH HHS; P51 OD011132/OD/NIH HHS; P51 RR00165/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; R01 MH050268/MH/NIMH NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
9002-60-2/Adrenocorticotropic Hormone
Comments/Corrections

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