Document Detail


Sex-based differences in the tensile properties of the human anterior cruciate ligament.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  16387307     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
After immense amounts of research, the root cause for the significantly higher rates of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) failure incidents in females as compared to males still remains unknown and the existing sex-based disparity has not diminished. To date, the possibility that the female ACL is mechanically weaker than the male ACL has not been directly investigated. Although it has been established in the literature that the female ACL is smaller in size, the differences in the structural and material properties of the ACL between sexes have not been studied. The aim of this cadaveric study was to determine if any sex-based differences in the tensile properties of the human ACL exist when considering age as well as ACL and body anthropometric measurements as covariates. Ten male and 10 female unpaired cadaveric knees (mean age 36.75 years) were used for this study. The geometry of the ACL (including length, cross-sectional area, and volume) was analyzed using a 3-D scanning system. The femur-ACL tibia complex was tested to failure along the longitudinal axis of the ligament in a tensile testing machine. The structural properties of the ACL as well as its mechanical properties were determined. Analysis of covariance was performed to assess the effect of sex on tensile properties. The female ACL was found to have a lower mechanical properties (8.3% lower strain at failure; 14.3% lower stress at failure, 9.43% lower strain energy density at failure, and most importantly, 22.49% lower modulus of elasticity) when considering age, ACL, and body anthropometric measurements as covariates.
Authors:
Naveen Chandrashekar; Hossein Mansouri; James Slauterbeck; Javad Hashemi
Related Documents :
17292707 - Sex differences in cloninger's temperament dimensions--a meta-analysis.
21181247 - Seat belt use among overweight and obese adolescents.
20557597 - Differences in delta13c and delta15n stable isotopes in the pearly razorfish xyrichtys ...
23764457 - P53-dependent delayed effects of radiation vary according to time of irradiation of p53...
9116387 - Discrepancies in normative data between lunar and hologic dxa systems.
926867 - Aging in the nematode caenorhabditis elegans: major biological and environmental factor...
Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article     Date:  2006-01-04
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of biomechanics     Volume:  39     ISSN:  0021-9290     ISO Abbreviation:  J Biomech     Publication Date:  2006  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2006-11-28     Completed Date:  2007-01-25     Revised Date:  2009-11-11    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0157375     Medline TA:  J Biomech     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  2943-50     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-1021, USA.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Anterior Cruciate Ligament / physiology*
Biomechanics
Female
Humans
Knee Joint / physiology*
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Characteristics*
Stress, Mechanical
Tensile Strength / physiology

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotesinogen (AGT) genes and their ass...
Next Document:  A kinematic model of the shoulder complex to evaluate the arm-reachable workspace.