Document Detail


Severe esophageal injuries caused by accidental button battery ingestion in children.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  25400396     Owner:  NLM     Status:  PubMed-not-MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
INTRODUCTION: Button batteries represent a low percentage of all foreign bodies swallowed by children and esophageal location is even less frequent. However, these cases are more likely to develop severe injuries. The aim of this essay is to report three cases treated in our institution and review previous reports.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: Chart review and literature search.
CASE REPORTS: We treated three children between 2-7- years old with button batteries lodged at esophagus. They all presented esophageal burns (EB), which evolved in esophageal stenosis in two out of the three cases.
RESULTS: We found 29 more cases in literature and the injuries included EB, esophageal perforation (EP) and tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF).
DISCUSSION: Swallowed button batteries rarely remain in esophagus, but these cases present a higher risk of tisular damage. Injuries can take place even after few hours; and therefore, endoscopy must be performed as soon as possible. Further study on button batteries' safety and the establishment of a maximum size for them would be good preventive measures.
Authors:
Sara Fuentes; Indalecio Cano; María Isabel Benavent; Andrés Gómez
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of emergencies, trauma, and shock     Volume:  7     ISSN:  0974-2700     ISO Abbreviation:  J Emerg Trauma Shock     Publication Date:  2014 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2014-11-17     Completed Date:  2014-11-17     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101493921     Medline TA:  J Emerg Trauma Shock     Country:  India    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  316-21     Citation Subset:  -    
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