Document Detail


Seventeen-month-olds appeal to false beliefs to interpret others' referential communication.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20977561     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Process    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Recent studies have demonstrated infants' pragmatic abilities for resolving the referential ambiguity of non-verbal communicative gestures, and for inferring the intended meaning of a communicator's utterances. These abilities are difficult to reconcile with the view that it is not until around 4 years that children can reason about the internal mental states of others. In the current study, we tested whether 17-month-old infants are able to track the status of a communicator's epistemic state and use this to infer what she intends to refer to. Our results show that manipulating whether or not a communicator has a false belief leads infants to different interpretations of the same communicative act, and demonstrate early mental state attribution in a pragmatic context.
Authors:
Victoria Southgate; Coralie Chevallier; Gergely Csibra
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Developmental science     Volume:  13     ISSN:  1467-7687     ISO Abbreviation:  Dev Sci     Publication Date:  2010 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-10-27     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9814574     Medline TA:  Dev Sci     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  907-12     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
© 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Affiliation:
Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, School of Psychology, Birkbeck, University of London, UK. v.southgate@bbk.ac.uk
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
G0701484//Medical Research Council

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