Document Detail


Serial respiratory adaptations and an alternate hypothesis of respiratory control in human pregnancy.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  16311079     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
This study determined the time course of changes in resting and exercising respiratory responses during the first half of human pregnancy, and examined the potential roles of plasma osmolality and the strong ion difference ([SID]) as mediators of pregnancy-induced increases in ventilation. Healthy active women (n = 11) were studied serially from 7 to 22 weeks gestation. Responses were compared with preconception data from 14 subjects (six of whom were tested in early pregnancy), and with late-gestation resting data from 10 additional women. Resting and exercising measurements included ventilation, PaCO2, progesterone, osmolality and [SID]. Results were analyzed using mixed-model linear regression. By 7 weeks gestation, increased ventilation resulted in a very large decrease in PaCO2 at rest and during moderate-intensity exercise. Large correlations (r > 0.5) between resting progesterone and PaCO2 support the traditional theory that circulating progesterone stimulates ventilation during pregnancy. The similar time course of changes and large correlations between raw and delta values of PaCO2 and each of plasma osmolality and [SID] also suggest that both variables may influence respiratory control at rest and during exercise in the first half of pregnancy. Future experiments should continue to explore the hypothesis that osmolality and [SID] contribute to pregnancy-induced respiratory changes.
Authors:
Tracey L Weissgerber; Larry A Wolfe; Will G Hopkins; Gregory A L Davies
Related Documents :
7556039 - Effects of baseline responses, in-task feelings, and duration of activity on exercise-i...
22073029 - Clarifying exercise addiction: differential diagnosis, co-occurring disorders, and phas...
8888449 - A comparison of cross-sectional and longitudinal methods of assessing the influence of ...
7945619 - Fetal responses to maternal exercise: effect on fetal breathing and body movement.
19052809 - Outcome assessment of breast distortion following submuscular breast augmentation.
15093569 - Physical exercise results in the improved subjective well-being of a few or is effectiv...
21168179 - Effects induced by exercise on lymphocyte β-adrenergic receptors and plasma catecholam...
3678179 - Exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage in the horse: results of a detailed clinical, po...
22926279 - Specific trunk and general exercise elicit similar changes in anticipatory postural adj...
Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2005-11-28
Journal Detail:
Title:  Respiratory physiology & neurobiology     Volume:  153     ISSN:  1569-9048     ISO Abbreviation:  Respir Physiol Neurobiol     Publication Date:  2006 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2006-07-31     Completed Date:  2006-09-29     Revised Date:  2008-11-21    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101140022     Medline TA:  Respir Physiol Neurobiol     Country:  Netherlands    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  39-53     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
School of Physical and Health Education, Queen's University, Kingston, Ont., Canada K7L 3N6. 7tw1@qlink.queensu.ca
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Acclimatization / physiology*
Acid-Base Equilibrium / physiology
Adult
Blood Gas Analysis / methods
Exercise Test
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Osmolar Concentration
Partial Pressure
Physical Exertion / physiology
Pregnancy / blood,  physiology*
Pulmonary Gas Exchange / physiology
Pulmonary Ventilation / physiology*
Respiration*
Respiratory Mechanics / physiology*
Rest / physiology
Time Factors

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Altered diaphragm muscle action potentials in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats.
Next Document:  Respiratory changes in a murine model of spontaneous systemic lupus erythematosus.