Document Detail


Self-reported pregnancy and access to primary health care among sexually experienced new zealand high school students.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22018567     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
PURPOSE: To determine the prevalence of self-reported pregnancy among sexually experienced high school students, and the association between teenage pregnancy and access to primary health care.
METHODS: Between March and October 2007, 96 high schools throughout New Zealand participated in Youth'07, a cross-sectional Health and Wellbeing survey. The dataset included 2,620 (1,217 females and 1,403 males) year 9 through 13 students who reported ever having sexual intercourse and responded to a question about whether they had ever been pregnant or ever caused a pregnancy.
RESULTS: Nationwide, 10.6% of sexually experienced high school students self-reported that they had been pregnant (11.6%) or caused a pregnancy (9.9%). Māori (15.3%) and Pacific Island (14.1%) students had the highest self-reports of pregnancy. Foregone health care was reported by 24.2% of sexually experienced students. Students who self-reported pregnancy reported greater difficulty accessing health care (41.7% vs. 20.6%; odds ratio: 2.6); however, when they accessed care, the majority received confidential care (67.4%) as compared with pregnancy-inexperienced peers (51.6%). Concern about privacy was the most common reason for not accessing health care. Other barriers included uncertainty about how to access care and lack of transportation (all p values < .05).
CONCLUSIONS: Self-reported pregnancy among sexually active high school students in New Zealand is high and ethnic disparities exist. Being pregnant or causing a pregnancy is associated with difficulty accessing health care. Further research is needed to identify drivers for ethnic differences and determine what the cause-and-effect relationship between teenage pregnancy and access to health care looks like.
Authors:
Rachel J Copland; Simon J Denny; Elizabeth M Robinson; Sue Crengle; Shanthi Ameratunga; Robyn Dixon
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article     Date:  2011-06-08
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine     Volume:  49     ISSN:  1879-1972     ISO Abbreviation:  J Adolesc Health     Publication Date:  2011 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-10-24     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9102136     Medline TA:  J Adolesc Health     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  518-24     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2011 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Department of Community Paediatrics, School of Population Health, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
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