Document Detail


Self-Mutilation and Biblical Delusions: A Review.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22652302     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To review the literature for cases of deliberate self-harm that directly reference Bible verses as a motivation for action and discuss predictive factors of such behaviors and post-injury management strategies. METHODS: Sixteen cases of self-mutilation prompted by Biblical verses were found in the existing literature. The authors also describe a novel case of penile amputation prompted by a verse from the Gospel of Matthew. RESULTS: Four biblical verses associated with self-mutilation were found, all from the Gospel of Matthew. All patients presented with a diagnosis of psychosis at the time of the event. Other common themes include substance abuse, guilt over sexual acts, absence of pain or regret, and destruction of the severed body part. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with symptoms of psychosis may misinterpret various verses from the Gospel of Matthew as instructions to engage in self-injurious behavior. Psychiatrists should be aware of these four verses to understand their significance and potentially forestall these behaviors.
Authors:
John P Schwerkoske; Jason P Caplan; Dawn M Benford
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-5-29
Journal Detail:
Title:  Psychosomatics     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1545-7206     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2012 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-6-1     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376506     Medline TA:  Psychosomatics     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE.
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