Document Detail


Seizures Do Not Increase In-Hospital Mortality After Intracerebral Hemorrhage in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23138543     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Seizures are common after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) but their impact on outcome is uncertain and prophylactic anti-convulsant use is controversial. We hypothesized that seizures would not increase the risk of in-hospital mortality in a large administrative database. METHODS: The study population included patients in the 2006 Nationwide Inpatient Sample over the age of 18 with a principal diagnosis of ICH (ICD9 = 431). Subjects with a secondary diagnosis of aneurysm, arterio-venous malformation, brain tumor, or traumatic brain injury were excluded. Seizures were defined by ICD9 codes (345.0x-345.5x, 345.7x-345.9x, 780.39). Logistic regression was used to quantify the relationship between seizures and in-hospital mortality. Pre-specified subgroups included age strata, length of stay, and invasive procedures. RESULTS: 13,033 subjects met all eligibility criteria, of which 1,430 (11.0 %) had a secondary diagnosis of seizure. Subjects with seizure were younger (64 vs. 70 years, p < 0.001), more likely to get craniectomy (2.1 vs. 1.2 %, p = 0.006), ventriculostomy (8.5 vs. 6.0 %, p < 0.001), intubation (32.2 vs. 25.9 %, p < 0.001), and tracheostomy (6.4 vs. 4.2 %, p < 0.001). Seizure patients had lower in-hospital mortality (24.3 vs. 28.0 %, p = 0.003). In a multivariable model incorporating patient and hospital level variables, seizures were associated with reduced odds of in-hospital death (OR = 0.62, 95 % CI 0.52-0.75). CONCLUSIONS: A secondary diagnosis of seizure after ICH was not associated with increased in-hospital death overall or in any of the pre-specified subgroups; however, there may be residual confounding by severity. These findings do not support a need for routine prophylactic anti-epileptic drug use after ICH.
Authors:
Michael T Mullen; Scott E Kasner; Steven R Messé
Related Documents :
24661713 - Hypoxic ischemic brain injury following in hospital cardiac arrest - lessons from autopsy.
24755863 - Hyperosmolar therapy in severe traumatic brain injury: a survey of emergency physicians...
20707263 - Moving quality and cost to the top of the hospital agenda.
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-11-9
Journal Detail:
Title:  Neurocritical care     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1556-0961     ISO Abbreviation:  Neurocrit Care     Publication Date:  2012 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-11-9     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101156086     Medline TA:  Neurocrit Care     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, 3 W Gates Building, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA, michael.mullen@uphs.upenn.edu.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Ultrafine sputter-deposited Pt nanoparticles for triiodide reduction in dye-sensitized solar cells: ...
Next Document:  Clinical prediction models for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a systematic review.