Document Detail


Sedentary behaviors increase risk of cardiovascular disease mortality in men.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  19996993     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between two sedentary behaviors (riding in a car and watching TV) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in men in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study.
METHODS: Participants were 7744 men (20-89 yr) initially free of CVD who returned a mail-back survey during 1982. Time spent watching TV and time spent riding in a car were reported. Mortality data were ascertained through the National Death Index until December 31, 2003. Cox regression analysis quantified the association between sedentary behaviors (hours per week watching TV, hours per week riding in a car, and total hours per week in these two behaviors) and CVD mortality rates.
RESULTS: Three hundred and seventy-seven CVD deaths occurred during 21 yr of follow-up. After age adjustment, time riding in a car and combined time spent in these two sedentary behaviors were positively (P(trend) < 0.001) associated with CVD death. Men who reported >10 h x wk(-1) riding in a car or >23 h x wk(-1) of combined sedentary behavior had 82% and 64% greater risk of dying from CVD than those who reported <4 or <11 h x wk(-1), respectively. The pattern of the association did not materially change after multivariate adjustment. Regardless of the amount of sedentary activity reported by these men, being older, having normal weight, being normotensive, and being physically active were associated with a reduced risk of CVD death.
CONCLUSION: In men, riding in a car and combined time spent in these two sedentary behaviors were significant CVD mortality predictors. In addition, high levels of physical activity were related to notably lower rates of CVD death even in the presence of high levels of sedentary behavior. Health promotion efforts targeting physically inactive men should emphasize both reducing sedentary activity and increasing regular physical activity for optimal cardiovascular health.
Authors:
Tatiana Y Warren; Vaughn Barry; Steven P Hooker; Xuemei Sui; Timothy S Church; Steven N Blair
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Medicine and science in sports and exercise     Volume:  42     ISSN:  1530-0315     ISO Abbreviation:  Med Sci Sports Exerc     Publication Date:  2010 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-04-20     Completed Date:  2010-08-04     Revised Date:  2013-05-31    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8005433     Medline TA:  Med Sci Sports Exerc     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  879-85     Citation Subset:  IM; S    
Affiliation:
Department of Exercise Science, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA. warrenty@mailbox.sc.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases / mortality*
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk Assessment*
Sedentary Lifestyle*
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
AG06945/AG/NIA NIH HHS; HL62508/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R01 AG006945-15/AG/NIA NIH HHS; R01 HL062508-06/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS
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