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Second-order schedules: a comparison of chained, brief-stimulus, and tandem procedures.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  16811717     Owner:  NLM     Status:  PubMed-not-MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Pigeons were exposed to seven types of two-component schedules, each component a 2-min fixed-interval schedule. Food presentation occurred at the completion of the second component under all conditions. The seven types of schedules were: (1) a chained schedule in which completion of the first component produced the discriminative stimulus associated with the second component; (2) a chained schedule to which was added the brief presentation of a food-paired stimulus at the completion of the first component; (3) a chained schedule to which was added the brief presentation of a stimulus not paired with food at the completion of the first component; (4) a multiple schedule in which food presentation occurred at the completion of both components; (5) a tandem schedule in which completion of the first component initiated the second component, with no changes in exteroceptive stimuli; (6) a food-paired brief-stimulus schedule in which the brief presentation of a food-paired stimulus was made at the completion of the first component and no other changes in stimuli occurred; and (7) a brief-stimulus schedule in which the brief presentation of a stimulus not paired with food was made at the completion of the first component and no other changes in stimuli occurred. Positively accelerated patterns of responding developed in the first component under three conditions: (1) the chained schedule with the added food-paired brief stimulus; (2) the multiple schedule; and (3) the food-paired brief-stimulus schedule. Response rates were low in the first component, with few instances of positively accelerated patterns, under two conditions: (1) the chained schedule; and (2) the chained schedule with the added nonpaired brief stimulus. The results suggest that a briefly presented food-paired stimulus may function as a more effective conditioned reinforcer than does the presentation of a discriminative stimulus.
Authors:
E F Malagodi; J Deweese; J M Johnston
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of the experimental analysis of behavior     Volume:  20     ISSN:  0022-5002     ISO Abbreviation:  J Exp Anal Behav     Publication Date:  1973 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-06-29     Completed Date:  2010-06-29     Revised Date:  2010-09-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0203727     Medline TA:  J Exp Anal Behav     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  447-60     Citation Subset:  -    
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