Document Detail


Season of birth in Down's syndrome.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  7779662     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Previous studies have found a summer peak in the birth of individuals with Down's syndrome but have not tended to examine them into adulthood. The aims of this study were to look for evidence of a seasonal effect in birth and to uncover any differences in adulthood between those born in different seasons. The casenotes of all adults with Down's syndrome from the catchment area of a hospital for people with learning disability were examined. A summer peak in births was confirmed. Only 6% of births took place during January and February compared with the 17% expected (P = 0.019); birth during these 2 months was associated with female sex (P = 0.047). There was a trend for those born in December to March not to develop epilepsy (P = 0.053).
Authors:
B K Puri; I Singh
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The British journal of clinical practice     Volume:  49     ISSN:  0007-0947     ISO Abbreviation:  Br J Clin Pract     Publication Date:    1995 May-Jun
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1995-07-17     Completed Date:  1995-07-17     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0372546     Medline TA:  Br J Clin Pract     Country:  ENGLAND    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  129-30     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School, London.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cluster Analysis
Down Syndrome / epidemiology*
Female
Humans
Learning Disorders / etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Seasons*
Sex Factors

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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