Document Detail


Scurvy: a disease almost forgotten.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  16911372     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Although much decreased in prevalence, scurvy still exists in industrialized societies. Few recent large studies have examined its pathogenesis, signs, and symptoms. METHODS: After we diagnosed scurvy in a 77-year-old female patient in 2003, we conducted a retrospective records review to identify patients with scurvy treated between 1976 and 2002 at Mayo Clinic (Scottsdale, Arizona; Rochester, Minnesota; or Jacksonville, Florida). We also searched the English-language medical literature for published reports on scurvy. RESULTS: In addition to our patient, seven of 11 patients whose records in the institutional database mentioned vitamin C deficiency were women. The age ranged from a neonate to 77 years (mean, 48 years). The most common associated causes were concomitant gastrointestinal disease, poor dentition, food faddism, and alcoholism. Vitamin or mineral deficiencies other than vitamin C deficiency were also found in our patients who had scurvy. The most common symptoms were bruising, arthralgias, or joint swelling. The most common signs were pedal edema, bruising, or mucosal changes. Four patients had vague symptoms of myalgias and fatigue without classic findings, and five had concomitant nutritional deficiencies. Follow-up available for six of 12 patients treated by vitamin C supplementation showed complete resolution of symptoms in five. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with scurvy may present with classic symptoms and signs or with nonspecific clinical symptoms and an absence of diagnostically suggestive physical findings. Concomitant deficiency states occur not uncommonly. Taking a thorough dietary history and measuring serum ascorbic acid levels should be considered for patients with classic signs and symptoms, nonspecific musculoskeletal complaints, or other vitamin or mineral deficiencies.
Authors:
Jesse M Olmedo; James A Yiannias; Elizabeth B Windgassen; Michael K Gornet
Publication Detail:
Type:  Case Reports; Journal Article; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  International journal of dermatology     Volume:  45     ISSN:  0011-9059     ISO Abbreviation:  Int. J. Dermatol.     Publication Date:  2006 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2006-08-16     Completed Date:  2007-01-10     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0243704     Medline TA:  Int J Dermatol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  909-13     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Dermatology, Division of Regional and International Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona 85259, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Ascorbic Acid Deficiency / complications
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Scurvy* / diagnosis,  drug therapy,  etiology

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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