Document Detail


Satisfied patients are also vulnerable patients--narratives from an acute care ward.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  16968428     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
AIM: To illuminate the experience of being a patient and cared for in an acute care ward. BACKGROUND: Patients may be the best source of information for assessing the quality of care in acute care wards. Studies often show that patients' satisfaction with their hospital stay is interpreted by managers and care providers as a measure for quality of care. DESIGN: Ten patients were interviewed as part of a comprehensive investigation by four researchers into the narratives of five enrolled nurses (study No. 1--published in Nursing Ethics 2004), five Registered Nurses (study No. 2 published in Nursing Ethics 2005) and 10 patients (study No. 3) about their experiences from an acute care ward at one university hospital in Sweden. METHOD: A phenomenological hermeneutical method (inspired by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur) was conducted in all three studies. FINDINGS: The patients are very satisfied with their treatment and care. They also tell about factors that they do not consider as optimal, but which they explain as compromises, which must be accepted as a necessary part of their stay in the ward. This study demonstrates a close connection between patient satisfaction and vulnerability. CONCLUSIONS: It is important for all health care providers not to be complacent and satisfied when patients express their satisfaction with their treatment and care. This can result in losing the focus on the patients' vulnerability and existential thoughts and reflections which are difficult for them, and which need to be addressed. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The findings can be seen as a challenge for the health care providers as well as the organization to provide quality of care to patients in acute care ward. When listening to the patients' voice it makes it easier to be aware of the content of their vulnerability.
Authors:
Venke Sørlie; Kirsti Torjuul; Anita Ross; Mona Kihlgren
Related Documents :
7895978 - Major determinants of consumer satisfaction with primary care in different health systems.
17469998 - Combining dispositions and evaluations of vocation and job to account for counterproduc...
21240098 - Limits to autonomy and personalization.
21284818 - Emergency department workforce models: what the literature can tell us.
10687648 - Issues of euthanasia.
25433358 - Medical and salutogenic approaches and their integration in taking prenatal and postnat...
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of clinical nursing     Volume:  15     ISSN:  0962-1067     ISO Abbreviation:  J Clin Nurs     Publication Date:  2006 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2006-09-13     Completed Date:  2006-11-06     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9207302     Medline TA:  J Clin Nurs     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1240-6     Citation Subset:  N    
Affiliation:
Institute of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. venke.sorlie@medisin.uio.no
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Acute Disease / nursing,  psychology*
Adaptation, Psychological*
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Existentialism / psychology
Fear
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Narration
Needs Assessment
Negotiating / psychology
Nurse's Role / psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Care / organization & administration,  psychology*
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital / psychology
Patient Satisfaction*
Quality of Health Care / standards
Questionnaires
Sweden
Touch
Vulnerable Populations / psychology*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  The health beliefs of hospital staff and the reporting of needlestick injury.
Next Document:  Student nurses' experiences of caring for infectious patients in source isolation. A hermeneutic phe...