Document Detail


Satiety signals and obesity.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23314812     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The obesity epidemic over the world has called to attention different ways to manage this development. As bariatric surgery today is the only manner by which rapid and sustained weight control can be achieved, new ways of treating obesity are under investigation. This review focuses on today's knowledge on satiety signaling as a means to combat obesity. RECENT FINDINGS: The combined knowledge achieved from obesity surgery with gastric bypass and duodenal switch together with the pharmacological treatment of type 2 diabetes have given us some clues of how to manage obesity. The basis for our understanding is the present research focusing on the gut peptide hormones that are released in response to food intake, and the paucity of satiety signaling seems to prevail in obesity. This means that obese patients experience less activation of higher brain centers in association with a meal and therefore compensate with increased meal size or frequent food intake. SUMMARY: Altered satiety signaling primarily emanating from the gastrointestinal tract seems to lead to the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Pharmacological tools that enhance the gut hormone signaling are in focus for the upcoming venues of treatment.
Authors:
Per M Hellström
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2013-1-9
Journal Detail:
Title:  Current opinion in gastroenterology     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1531-7056     ISO Abbreviation:  Curr. Opin. Gastroenterol.     Publication Date:  2013 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-1-14     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8506887     Medline TA:  Curr Opin Gastroenterol     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
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