Document Detail


Salivary Gland Biopsy for Sjögren's Syndrome.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  24287191     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Salivary gland biopsy is a technique broadly applied for the diagnosis of Sjögren's syndrome (SS), lymphoma accompanying SS, sarcoidosis, amyloidosis, and other connective tissue disorders. SS has characteristic microscopic findings involving lymphocytic infiltration surrounding the excretory ducts in combination with destruction of acinar tissue. This article focuses on the main techniques used for taking labial and parotid salivary gland biopsies in the diagnostic workup of SS with respect to their advantages, their postoperative complications, and their usefulness for diagnostic procedures, monitoring disease progression, and treatment evaluation.
Authors:
Konstantina Delli; Arjan Vissink; Fred K L Spijkervet
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Oral and maxillofacial surgery clinics of North America     Volume:  26     ISSN:  1558-1365     ISO Abbreviation:  Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am     Publication Date:  2014 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-11-29     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9001454     Medline TA:  Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  23-33     Citation Subset:  D; IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.
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