Document Detail


Safety and exercise tolerance of acute high altitude exposure (3454 m) among patients with coronary artery disease.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  16339809     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVES: To assess the safety and cardiopulmonary adaptation to high altitude exposure among patients with coronary artery disease. METHODS: 22 patients (20 men and 2 women), mean age 57 (SD 7) years, underwent a maximal, symptom limited exercise stress test in Bern, Switzerland (540 m) and after a rapid ascent to the Jungfraujoch (3454 m). The study population comprised 15 patients after ST elevation myocardial infarction and 7 after a non-ST elevation myocardial infarction 12 (SD 4) months after the acute event. All patients were revascularised either by percutaneous coronary angioplasty (n = 15) or by coronary artery bypass surgery (n = 7). Ejection fraction was 60 (SD 8)%. beta blocking agents were withheld for five days before exercise testing. RESULTS: At 3454 m, peak oxygen uptake decreased by 19% (p < 0.001), maximum work capacity by 15% (p < 0.001) and exercise time by 16% (p < 0.001); heart rate, ventilation and lactate were significantly higher at every level of exercise, except at maximum exertion. No ECG signs of myocardial ischaemia or significant arrhythmias were noted. CONCLUSIONS: Although oxygen demand and lactate concentrations are higher during exercise at high altitude, a rapid ascent and submaximal exercise can be considered safe at an altitude of 3454 m for low risk patients six months after revascularisation for an acute coronary event and a normal exercise stress test at low altitude.
Authors:
J-P Schmid; M Noveanu; R Gaillet; G Hellige; A Wahl; H Saner
Related Documents :
19940099 - Airway responses to methacholine and exercise at high altitude in healthy lowlanders.
6473249 - Vital gas exchange and hatchability of turkey eggs at high altitude.
24192849 - Effects of short-term heated water-based exercise training on systemic blood pressure i...
2055289 - Serum immunoreactive erythropoietin in high altitude natives with and without excessive...
6542519 - After effects of chronic hypoxia on cardiac output and muscle blood flow at rest and ex...
11500309 - High-altitude acclimation increases the triacylglycerol/fatty acid cycle at rest and du...
18545199 - Identification of a vo2 deflection point coinciding with the heart rate deflection poin...
12869359 - Benefits of supplemental oxygen in exercise training in nonhypoxemic chronic obstructiv...
10800019 - Pilot study of a graded exercise program for the treatment of anorexia nervosa.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article     Date:  2005-12-09
Journal Detail:
Title:  Heart (British Cardiac Society)     Volume:  92     ISSN:  1468-201X     ISO Abbreviation:  Heart     Publication Date:  2006 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2006-06-15     Completed Date:  2006-07-18     Revised Date:  2009-11-18    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9602087     Medline TA:  Heart     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  921-5     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Swiss Cardiovascular Centre Bern, Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation, University Hospital (Inselspital), Bern, Switzerland. jean-paul.schmid@insel.ch
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Aged
Altitude*
Blood Pressure / physiology
Coronary Artery Disease / physiopathology*
Exercise / physiology
Exercise Tolerance
Female
Heart Rate / physiology
Humans
Lactates / metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Oxygen Consumption / physiology
Respiration
Risk Factors
Safety
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Lactates
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Major impact of admission glycaemia on 30 day and one year mortality in non-diabetic patients admitt...
Next Document:  The sound of silence is music to the heart.