Document Detail


Roles of perinatal problems on adolescent antisocial behaviors among children born after 33 completed weeks: a prospective investigation.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  18673404     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: There is uncertainty about the extent to which mildly sub-optimal perinatal characteristics among individuals born near-term (>33 weeks of gestation) are associated with various subsequent childhood problems, including antisocial behavior. There is even more uncertainty about whether the pathway to antisocial behavior differs by gender.
METHODS: A sample of 1689 infants, born near-term, was followed from birth for over 30 years. Using structural equation modeling (SEM), the study evaluated hypothesized mechanisms linking perinatal problems to antisocial behavior, mediated through the following variables in early and later childhood: neurological abnormalities at age 1; hearing, speech, and language problems at age 3; cognitive function at age 4; and academic performance at age 7. Childhood problems were assessed by trained research clinicians, blind to perinatal status. An 'antisocial behavior' variable was created, based on retrospective self-report of six antisocial incidences assessed in adulthood.
RESULTS: Path coefficients showed that birthweight, head circumference, and Apgar scores were indirectly associated with antisocial behavior in the presence of one or more of the following: neurological abnormalities, abnormality in language, speech, and hearing, cognitive function, or academic performance. We found gender differences only in the associations between hearing and IQ and between language perception and IQ. Poor academic performance was associated with antisocial behavior in both boys and girls.
CONCLUSION: Our hypothesis, that perinatal problems may progress to antisocial behavior when mediated by various markers of early childhood problems, was confirmed. Adverse perinatal events need to be considered in identifying infants who are at risk for academic problems and antisocial behavior, even when the infant is born relatively close to term (i.e., >33 weeks). Poor academic performance, which is indirectly influenced by a variety of neurological and cognitive problems during the perinatal period, infancy, and early childhood appear to increase antisocial behavioral problems in both girls and boys.
Authors:
Yoko Nomura; Khushmand Rajendran; Jeanne Brooks-Gunn; Jeffrey H Newcorn
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2008-07-29
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines     Volume:  49     ISSN:  1469-7610     ISO Abbreviation:  J Child Psychol Psychiatry     Publication Date:  2008 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2008-11-21     Completed Date:  2009-03-05     Revised Date:  2013-06-05    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0375361     Medline TA:  J Child Psychol Psychiatry     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1108-17     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY 10029USA. Yoko.Nomura@mssm.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Antisocial Personality Disorder / epidemiology*
Apgar Score
Baltimore / epidemiology
Birth Weight
Cephalometry
Child Behavior Disorders / epidemiology*
Communication Disorders / epidemiology
Developmental Disabilities / epidemiology*
Educational Status
Female
Hearing Disorders / epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intelligence
Male
Neonatal Screening
Prospective Studies
Risk Factors
Sex Distribution
Single-Blind Method
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
R03 MH067761-02/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; R03MH067761/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; R24 HD047879/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R24 HD047879-04/HD/NICHD NIH HHS
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