Document Detail


Role of anti-inflammatory adipokines in obesity-related diseases.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  24746980     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Obesity results in many health complications. Accumulating evidence indicates that the obese state is characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation, thereby leading to the initiation and progression of obesity-related disorders such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and atherosclerosis. Fat tissue releases numerous bioactive molecules, called adipokines, which affect whole-body homeostasis. Most adipokines are proinflammatory, whereas a small number of anti-inflammatory adipokines including adiponectin exert beneficial actions on obese complications. The dysregulated production of adipokines seen in obesity is linked to the pathogenesis of various disease processes. In this review we focus on the role of the anti-inflammatory adipokines that are of current interest in the setting of obesity-linked metabolic and cardiovascular diseases.
Authors:
Koji Ohashi; Rei Shibata; Toyoaki Murohara; Noriyuki Ouchi
Publication Detail:
Type:  REVIEW     Date:  2014-4-17
Journal Detail:
Title:  Trends in endocrinology and metabolism: TEM     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1879-3061     ISO Abbreviation:  Trends Endocrinol. Metab.     Publication Date:  2014 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2014-4-21     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9001516     Medline TA:  Trends Endocrinol Metab     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Physical exercise antagonizes clinical and anatomical features characterizing Lieber-DeCarli diet-in...
Next Document:  Impact of assisted reproductive technologies on intrauterine growth and birth defects in singletons.