Document Detail


Revisiting the mine/thine problem: A sensitizing exercise for clinic, classroom, and attributional research.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22686550     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Objective: Two studies revisit a sensitivity exercise designed to heighten awareness of the social psychology of disability. The "mine/thine problem" (Wright, 1975) is an imagination exercise where one's own (self-defined) disability is paired with a different disability. Participants imagine whether they would prefer to retain their disability or to exchange it for the other. Method: Study 1 (N = 52) was a conceptual replication, while Study 2 (N = 50) paired participants' own disabilities with one independently rated as more or less severe. Study 2 participants also completed the Scale of Attitudes Toward Disabled Persons (SADP; Antonak & Livneh, 1988) 3 times: 1 week before participation, immediately after, and 2 weeks later. Results: Replicating Wright (1975), participants retained their own disabilities (78% in Study 1, 90% in Study 2); varying the paired disabilities' severity had no effect on preference in Study 2, where, compared with pretest scores, participants expressed more favorable attitudes on the 2 posttest assessments of the SADP. Conclusions: The exercise sensitizes participants to insider (people with disabilities) and outsider (nondisabled) perspectives, leading to more favorable attitudes toward disability. Rehabilitation psychologists will benefit by revisiting and using this perspective-broadening exercise in clinic, classroom, and research settings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
Authors:
Dana S Dunn; David J Fisher; Brittany M Beard
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Rehabilitation psychology     Volume:  57     ISSN:  1939-1544     ISO Abbreviation:  Rehabil Psychol     Publication Date:  2012 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-06-12     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0365337     Medline TA:  Rehabil Psychol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  113-23     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Moravian College.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Does problem-solving training for family caregivers benefit their care recipients with severe disabi...
Next Document:  Telephone-based, cognitive-behavioral therapy for African American dementia caregivers with depressi...