Document Detail


A review of class I and class II pet food recalls involving chemical contaminants from 1996 to 2008.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21125435     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Commercial pet food in USA is generally safe, but adulteration does occur. Adulterated food has to be recalled to protect pets and public health. All stakeholders, including food firms, distributors, and government agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) participate in food recall. The objective of this review is to describe the pet food recall procedure from start to finish, and to review class I and II pet food recalls from 1996 to 2008, with a specific focus on those due to chemical contaminants/adulterants. Information was requested from the FDA by Freedom of Information Act. Only those recalls backed by the FDA scientific review were considered. The legal framework for food recalls in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 21, Chapter 1, Part 7 and in the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007, Title X was reviewed. From 1996 to 2008, there were a total of 22 class I and II pet food recalls. Of these, only six (27%) were due to chemical adulterants. The adulterants were aflatoxins, cholecalciferol, methionine, and melamine, and cyanuric acid. The causes of adulteration included inadequate testing of raw materials for toxins, use of wrong or faulty mixing equipment, and misformulation of raw materials. Overall, pet food manufactured in the USA is safe. Even with shortcomings in the recall process, the incidence of illness associated with pet food adulteration is low. Added changes can only make the system better in the future to safeguard pet and public safety.
Authors:
Wilson Rumbeiha; Jamie Morrison
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of medical toxicology : official journal of the American College of Medical Toxicology     Volume:  7     ISSN:  1937-6995     ISO Abbreviation:  J Med Toxicol     Publication Date:  2011 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-03-14     Completed Date:  2011-07-19     Revised Date:  2013-07-31    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101284598     Medline TA:  J Med Toxicol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  60-6     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
© American College of Medical Toxicology 2010
Affiliation:
Department of Pathobiology and Diagnostic Investigation, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48910-8104, USA. Rumbeiha@dcpah.msu.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animal Feed / adverse effects,  analysis*
Animals
Cats
Consumer Product Safety
Dogs
Food Contamination*
Foodborne Diseases / prevention & control,  veterinary
Pets*
United States
United States Food and Drug Administration / legislation & jurisprudence
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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