Document Detail


Responses of the ear to low frequency sounds, infrasound and wind turbines.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20561575     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Infrasonic sounds are generated internally in the body (by respiration, heartbeat, coughing, etc) and by external sources, such as air conditioning systems, inside vehicles, some industrial processes and, now becoming increasingly prevalent, wind turbines. It is widely assumed that infrasound presented at an amplitude below what is audible has no influence on the ear. In this review, we consider possible ways that low frequency sounds, at levels that may or may not be heard, could influence the function of the ear. The inner ear has elaborate mechanisms to attenuate low frequency sound components before they are transmitted to the brain. The auditory portion of the ear, the cochlea, has two types of sensory cells, inner hair cells (IHC) and outer hair cells (OHC), of which the IHC are coupled to the afferent fibers that transmit "hearing" to the brain. The sensory stereocilia ("hairs") on the IHC are "fluid coupled" to mechanical stimuli, so their responses depend on stimulus velocity and their sensitivity decreases as sound frequency is lowered. In contrast, the OHC are directly coupled to mechanical stimuli, so their input remains greater than for IHC at low frequencies. At very low frequencies the OHC are stimulated by sounds at levels below those that are heard. Although the hair cells in other sensory structures such as the saccule may be tuned to infrasonic frequencies, auditory stimulus coupling to these structures is inefficient so that they are unlikely to be influenced by airborne infrasound. Structures that are involved in endolymph volume regulation are also known to be influenced by infrasound, but their sensitivity is also thought to be low. There are, however, abnormal states in which the ear becomes hypersensitive to infrasound. In most cases, the inner ear's responses to infrasound can be considered normal, but they could be associated with unfamiliar sensations or subtle changes in physiology. This raises the possibility that exposure to the infrasound component of wind turbine noise could influence the physiology of the ear.
Authors:
Alec N Salt; Timothy E Hullar
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review     Date:  2010-06-16
Journal Detail:
Title:  Hearing research     Volume:  268     ISSN:  1878-5891     ISO Abbreviation:  Hear. Res.     Publication Date:  2010 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-08-17     Completed Date:  2010-12-07     Revised Date:  2013-05-29    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7900445     Medline TA:  Hear Res     Country:  Netherlands    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  12-21     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University School of Medicine, Box 8115, 660 South Euclid Avenue, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. salta@ent.wustl.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Acoustic Stimulation
Animals
Auditory Threshold
Cochlear Microphonic Potentials
Ear, Inner / anatomy & histology,  physiology*
Humans
Noise* / adverse effects
Power Plants*
Pressure
Wind*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
KO8 DC 006869/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS; R01 DC001368/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS; R01 DC001368-18/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS; R01 DC01368/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS
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