Document Detail


Reproductive changes associated with celiac disease.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21155001     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Celiac disease is a mucosal disorder of the small intestine that may be triggered by dietary exposure to gluten in genetically-susceptible individuals. The disorder is often associated with diarrhea, malabsorption and weight loss along with other extra-intestinal complications. Reproductive changes have been described, including impaired fertility and adverse pregnancy outcomes possibly related to immune-mediated mechanisms or nutrient deficiency. Other possible pathogenetic factors that may alter placental function include maternal celiac disease autoantibodies binding to placental transglutaminase, and genetic mutations that may facilitate microthrombus formation. Reports noting activation during pregnancy or the puerperium may be important, and suggest that celiac disease may also be hypothetically precipitated by maternal exposure to one or more fetal antigens.
Authors:
Hugh-James Freeman
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  World journal of gastroenterology : WJG     Volume:  16     ISSN:  2219-2840     ISO Abbreviation:  World J. Gastroenterol.     Publication Date:  2010 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-12-14     Completed Date:  2011-03-14     Revised Date:  2014-05-20    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  100883448     Medline TA:  World J Gastroenterol     Country:  China    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  5810-4     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Celiac Disease / complications*
Female
Fertility
Humans
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications / etiology*
Pregnancy Outcome*
Reproduction*
Comments/Corrections

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