Document Detail


Reporting errors in one-week diarrhoea recall surveys: experience from a prospective study in rural Bangladesh.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  2807676     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
To estimate inaccuracy in a diarrhoea recall survey mothers of pre-school children in Teknaf, Bangladesh were interviewed every week from July 1980 through June 1983. Because the likelihood of an episode starting on any given day of the week should be equal, we were able to quantify any deviation observed. Results show an average of 34% less diarrhoea episodes reported prior to a 48-hour recall period in any week. The amount of reporting error was (a) directly related to the length of the recall period, and (b) inversely related to the severity of diarrhoea as indicated by presence of fever and frequency of motions. This analysis reveals that weekly diarrhoea recall surveys in Bangladesh underestimate severe diarrhoea cases by 20-22% and less severe cases by 42-44%. The findings also indicate that morbidity surveys based on lengthy recall are likely to mislead health planners with regard to the magnitude of the problem and the volume of resources required to combat it.
To estimate inaccuracy in a diarrhea recall survey, mothers of preschool children in Teknaf, Bangladesh were interviewed every week from July 1980-June 1983. Because the likelihood of an episode starting on any given day of the week should be equal, the authors were able to quantify any deviation observed. Results show an average of 34% less diarrhea episodes reported prior to a 48-hour recall period in any week. The amount of reporting error was directly related to the length of the recall period and inversely related to the severity of diarrhea as indicated by presence of fever and frequency of motions. This analysis reveals that weekly diarrhea recall surveys in Bangladesh underestimate severe diarrhea cases by 20-22% and less severe cases by 42-44%. The findings also indicate that morbidity surveys based on lengthy recall are likely to mislead health planner with regard to the magnitude of the problem and the volume of resources required to combat it.
Authors:
N Alam; F J Henry; M M Rahaman
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  International journal of epidemiology     Volume:  18     ISSN:  0300-5771     ISO Abbreviation:  Int J Epidemiol     Publication Date:  1989 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1989-12-07     Completed Date:  1989-12-07     Revised Date:  2007-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7802871     Medline TA:  Int J Epidemiol     Country:  ENGLAND    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  697-700     Citation Subset:  IM; J    
Affiliation:
International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Bangladesh / epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Diarrhea, Infantile / epidemiology*
Humans
Infant
Interviews as Topic
Memory*
Mental Recall*
Prospective Studies
Rural Population

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