Document Detail


Replacing foods high in saturated fat by low-saturated fat alternatives: a computer simulation of the potential effects on reduction of saturated fat consumption.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  19138448     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
This simulation study aimed to assess the change in saturated fat intake achieved by replacing one to three of the products contributing most to individual saturated fat intake by alternative products low in saturated fat. Food consumption data of 750 participants (aged 19-30 years) from a recent Dutch food consumption survey were used. For each participant, the three products (from different product groups) that contributed most to their saturated fat intake were ranked in order of diminishing contribution. These products were sequentially replaced by lower saturated fat alternatives that were available in Dutch supermarkets. Mean percentage energy (en%) from saturated fat and energy intake in kJ per d were calculated before and after each of the three replacements. Dutch cheese, meat (for dinner) and milk were the main contributors to saturated fat intake for most participants. Starting at a mean en% from saturated fat of 12.4, the three replacements together resulted in a mean reduction of 4.9 en% from saturated fat. The percentage of participants meeting the recommendation for saturated fat ( < 10 en%) increased from 23.3 % to 86.0 %. We conclude that the replacement of relatively few important high-saturated fat products by available lower-saturated fat alternatives can significantly reduce saturated fat intake and increase the proportion of individuals complying with recommended intake levels.
Authors:
Bilbo Schickenberg; Patricia van Assema; Johannes Brug; Janneke Verkaik-Kloosterman; Marga C Ocké; Nanne K de Vries
Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2009-01-13
Journal Detail:
Title:  The British journal of nutrition     Volume:  102     ISSN:  1475-2662     ISO Abbreviation:  Br. J. Nutr.     Publication Date:  2009 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2009-07-22     Completed Date:  2009-09-10     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0372547     Medline TA:  Br J Nutr     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  478-83     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Health Promotion, Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. bilbo.schickenberg@GVO.unimaas.nl
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Animals
Cheese
Computer Simulation*
Dietary Fats / administration & dosage*
Energy Intake*
Fatty Acids / administration & dosage*
Female
Food
Humans
Male
Meat
Milk
Netherlands
Young Adult
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Dietary Fats; 0/Fatty Acids

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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