Document Detail


Reliability and sensitivity of visual scales versus volumetry for evaluating white matter hyperintensity progression.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  18216467     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Investigating associations between the change of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and clinical symptoms over time is crucial for establishing a causal relationship. However, the most suitable method for measuring WMH progression has not been established yet. We compared the reliability and sensitivity of cross-sectional and longitudinal visual scales with volumetry for measuring WMH progression. METHODS: Twenty MRI scan pairs (interval 2 years) were included from the Amsterdam center of the LADIS study. Semi-automated volumetry of WMH was performed twice by one rater. Three cross-sectional scales (Fazekas Scale, Age-Related White Matter Changes Scale, Scheltens Scale) and two progression scales (Rotterdam Progression Scale, Schmidt Progression Scale) were scored by 4 and repeated by 2 raters. RESULTS: Mean WMH volume (24.6 +/- 27.9 ml at baseline) increased by 4.6 +/- 5.1 ml [median volume change (range) = 2.7 (-0.6 to 15.7) ml]. Measuring volumetric change in WMH was reliable (intraobserver:intraclass coefficient = 0.88). All visual scales showed significant change of WMH over time, although the sensitivity was highest for both of the progression scales. Proportional volumetric change of WMH correlated best with the Rotterdam Progression Scale (Spearman's r = 0.80, p < 0.001) and the Schmidt Progression Scale (Spearman's r = 0.64, p < 0.01). Although all scales were reliable for assessment of WMH cross-sectionally, WMH progression assessment using visual scales was less reliable, except for the Rotterdam Progression scale which had moderate to good reliability [weighted Cohen's kappa = 0.63 (intraobserver), 0.59 (interobserver)]. CONCLUSION: To determine change in WMH, dedicated progression scales are more sensitive and/or reliable and correlate better with volumetric volume change than cross-sectional scales.
Authors:
A A Gouw; W M van der Flier; E C W van Straaten; L Pantoni; A J Bastos-Leite; D Inzitari; T Erkinjuntti; L O Wahlund; C Ryberg; R Schmidt; F Fazekas; P Scheltens; F Barkhof;
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2008-01-24
Journal Detail:
Title:  Cerebrovascular diseases (Basel, Switzerland)     Volume:  25     ISSN:  1421-9786     ISO Abbreviation:  Cerebrovasc. Dis.     Publication Date:  2008  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2008-03-27     Completed Date:  2008-04-17     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9100851     Medline TA:  Cerebrovasc Dis     Country:  Switzerland    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  247-53     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Alzheimer Center, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. AA.Gouw@vumc.nl
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Aged
Brain / pathology*
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted*
Magnetic Resonance Imaging*
Male
Observer Variation
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and Specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Investigator
Investigator/Affiliation:
Timo Erkinjuntti / ; Tarja Pohjasvaara / ; Pia Pihanen / ; Raija Ylikoski / ; Hanna Jokinen / ; Meija-Marjut Somerkoski / ; Riitta Mäntylä / ; Oili Salonen / ; Franz Fazekas / ; Reinhold Schmidt / ; Stefan Ropele / ; Brigitte Rous / ; Katja Petrovic / ; Ulrike Garmehi / ; Alexandra Seewann / ; José M Ferro / ; Ana Verdelho / ; Sofia Madureira / ; Philip Scheltens / ; Ilse van Straaten / ; Frederik Barkhof / ; Alida Gouw / ; Wiesje van der Flier / ; Anders Wallin / ; Michael Jonsson / ; Karin Lind / ; Arto Nordlund / ; Sindre Rolstad / ; Ingela Isblad / ; Lars-Olof Wahlund / ; Milita Crisby / ; Anna Pettersson / ; Kaarina Amberla / ; Hugues Chabriat / ; Karen Hernandez / ; Annie Kurtz / ; Dominique Hervé / ; Michael Hennerici / ; Christian Blahak / ; Hansjörg Baezner / ; Martin Wiarda / ; Susanne Seip / ; Gunhild Waldemar / ; Egill Rostrup / ; Charlotte Ryberg / ; Tim Dyrby / ; Olaf B Paulson / ; John O'Brien / ; Sanjeet Pakrasi / ; Mani Krishnan / ; Michael Firbank / ; Philip English / ; Domenico Inzitari / ; Anna Maria Basile / ; Eliana Magnani / ; Monica Martini / ; Mario Mascalchi / ; Marco Moretti / ; Leonardo Pantoni / ; Anna Poggesi / ; Giovanni Pracucci / ; Emilia Salvadori / ; Michela Simoni / ; Domenico Inzitari / ; Timo Erkinjuntti / ; Philip Scheltens / ; Marieke Visser / ; Peter Langhorne / ; Kjell Asplund /

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