Document Detail


Relationship of field dependence and color coding to female students' achievement.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  11693711     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
This study examined the relationship of field dependence and differentially color coded instructional materials (black-and-white and colored) with 126 female students' achievement. Significant differences were found between field-independent and field-dependent students with the field-dependent students scoring higher on the Total Criterion measure. No significant interaction betWeen color coding and field dependence was found on the Total Criterion Test scores. Significant differences in achievement were found in favor of women who received the color-coded version of the Total Criterion Test. These results confirm previous findings relating to the importance of field dependence in visual information and points to the necessity for further systematic analysis of the unique contributions color-coded instructional strategies might have in facilitating the achievement of female students.
Authors:
D M Moore; F M Dwyer
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Perceptual and motor skills     Volume:  93     ISSN:  0031-5125     ISO Abbreviation:  Percept Mot Skills     Publication Date:  2001 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2001-11-05     Completed Date:  2002-01-30     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0401131     Medline TA:  Percept Mot Skills     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  81-5     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Virginia Tech, USA. moorem@VT.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Achievement*
Color Perception / physiology*
Female
Field Dependence-Independence*
Humans
Random Allocation
Students

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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