Document Detail


Relation of childhood socioeconomic status and family environment to adult metabolic functioning in the CARDIA study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  16314588     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: Low SES and a conflict-ridden, neglectful, or harsh family environment in childhood have been linked to a high rate of physical health disorders in adulthood. The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate a model of the pathways that may help to explain these links and to relate them to metabolic functioning (MF) in the Coronary Artery Risk Development In Young Adults (CARDIA) dataset. METHODS: Participants (n = 3225) in the year 15 assessment of CARDIA, age 33 to 45 years, completed measures of childhood socioeconomic status (SES), risky early family environment (RF), adult psychosocial functioning (PsyF, a latent factor measured by depression, hostility, positive and negative social contacts), and adult SES. Indicators of the latent factor MF were assessed, specifically, cholesterol, insulin, glucose, triglycerides, and waist circumference. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 9.7%. Structural equation modeling indicated that childhood SES and RF are associated with MF via their association with PsyF (standardized path coefficients: childhood SES to RF -0.13, RF to PsyF 0.44, PsyF to MF 0.09, all p < .05), but also directly (coefficient from childhood SES to MF -0.12, p < .05), with good overall model fit. When this model was tested separately for race-sex subgroups, it fit best for white women, fit well for African-American women and white men, but did not fit well for African-American men. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that childhood SES and early family environment contribute to metabolic functioning through pathways of depression, hostility, and poor quality of social contacts.
Authors:
Barbara J Lehman; Shelley E Taylor; Catarina I Kiefe; Teresa E Seeman
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Psychosomatic medicine     Volume:  67     ISSN:  1534-7796     ISO Abbreviation:  Psychosom Med     Publication Date:    2005 Nov-Dec
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2005-11-29     Completed Date:  2006-04-11     Revised Date:  2007-11-14    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376505     Medline TA:  Psychosom Med     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  846-54     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
African Continental Ancestry Group / statistics & numerical data
Child
Child Abuse / psychology
Comorbidity
Coronary Disease / epidemiology*
European Continental Ancestry Group / statistics & numerical data
Family / psychology*
Family Health*
Female
Health Status
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X / epidemiology*
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk Factors
Sex Factors
Social Adjustment
Social Class*
Social Environment*
Social Support
Urban Population
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
MH15750/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; N01-HC-05187/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC-45134/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC-48047/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC-48048/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC-48049/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC-48050/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC-95095/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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