Document Detail


Relation of anxiety about social physique to location of participation in physical activity.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  1501972     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of anxiety about social physique to location of participation in physical activity. 37 nursing students completed the Social Physique Anxiety Scale and answered questions relating to the location of the physical activity in which they participated. Women were assigned to either a high- or low-anxiety group based on these scores. An examination of the reported location where participation in physical activity occurred showed that more high than low scorers reported a tendency to exercise privately than publicly; the number was higher than expected. Perhaps high scorers prefer exercise settings that provide less opportunity for their physiques to be evaluated.
Authors:
K S Spink
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Perceptual and motor skills     Volume:  74     ISSN:  0031-5125     ISO Abbreviation:  Percept Mot Skills     Publication Date:  1992 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1992-09-14     Completed Date:  1992-09-14     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0401131     Medline TA:  Percept Mot Skills     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1075-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
College of Physical Education, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety / psychology*
Body Image*
Exercise*
Humans
Life Style
Physical Fitness / psychology
Social Environment*
Social Perception*
Students, Nursing / psychology

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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