Document Detail


Reduced airway responsiveness in nonelite runners.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  16331124     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
PURPOSE: The effects of endurance training on airway responsiveness in nonasthmatic subjects are poorly defined. We hypothesized that airway responsiveness may differ between none-lite endurance athletes and sedentary subjects, and studied healthy, nonelite runners and sedentary controls by single-dose methacholine challenges carried out in the absence of deep inspirations, in that deep inspirations are known to oppose airway narrowing in nonasthmatic subjects. METHODS: A total of 20 nonasthmatic none-lite runners (mean age+/- SD: 43.0+/- 8.5 yr; training volume: 68 km.wk; range: 40-100; racing experience: 11+/- 8 yr) and 20 sedentary controls (age: 44.0+/- 20.6 yr) were studied, all of them being normo-reactive to standard methacholine challenge up to 25 mg.mL concentration. All subjects were studied at rest; six runners were also studied about 1 h after completing the Palermo marathon (December 8, 2001). The primary outcome of the study was the inspiratory vital capacity (IVC) obtained after single-dose methacholine inhalation at the end of 20 min of deep inspiration prohibition. RESULTS: At rest, IVC decreased by 10.5+/-8.1% after challenge with methacholine at 75 mg.mL in athletes, and by 24.3+/-16.1% after a methacholine concentration of 52+/-5.7 mg.mL in sedentary controls (P=0.002). The decreased response to methacholine in runners did not correlate with static lung volumes, amount of weekly training, or running experience. CONCLUSION: Methacholine challenge under deep inspiration prohibition revealed that endurance training attenuates airway responsiveness in nonasthmatic, none-lite runners. Airway hyporesponsiveness was potentiated after the marathon, suggesting involvement of humoral (i.e., catecholamine levels), airway factors (i.e., nitric oxide), or both in modulating airway tone after exercise.
Authors:
Nicola Scichilone; Giuseppe Morici; Roberto Marchese; Anna Bonanno; Mirella Profita; Alkis Togias; Maria Rosaria Bonsignore
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Medicine and science in sports and exercise     Volume:  37     ISSN:  0195-9131     ISO Abbreviation:  Med Sci Sports Exerc     Publication Date:  2005 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2005-12-06     Completed Date:  2006-02-24     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8005433     Medline TA:  Med Sci Sports Exerc     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  2019-25     Citation Subset:  IM; S    
Affiliation:
Institute of Medicine and Pneumology, Respiratory Unit; University of Palermo, Italy. n.scichilone@libero.it
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Airway Resistance / physiology*
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Inspiratory Capacity / physiology
Male
Methacholine Chloride / pharmacology
Physical Endurance / physiology*
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory System / drug effects,  physiopathology*
Running / physiology*
Sports Medicine
Vital Capacity / physiology
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
62-51-1/Methacholine Chloride

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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