Document Detail


Recommended technique for brain removal to retain anatomic integrity of the pineal gland in order to determine its size in sudden infant death syndrome.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  8988580     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
A standardized removal and dissection procedure is presented for human infant brain. A previously unreported cistern of the pineal gland must be severed at autopsy in order to preserve the gland's anatomic integrity during brain removal. Utilization of these methods to investigate Sudden Infant Death Syndrome brain tissue should facilitate interdisciplinary studies and comparisons of inter agency findings. We use these dissection procedures to extend our findings on reduced pineal gland size as an anatomic marker assisting the forensic pathologist in making the diagnosis of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.
Authors:
D L Sparks; C M Coyne; L M Sparks; J C Hunsaker
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of forensic sciences     Volume:  42     ISSN:  0022-1198     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Forensic Sci.     Publication Date:  1997 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1997-02-04     Completed Date:  1997-02-04     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0375370     Medline TA:  J Forensic Sci     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  100-2     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, Department of Pathology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington 40536-0230, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Brain / surgery*
Forensic Medicine / methods*
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Methods
Pineal Gland / anatomy & histology*
Sudden Infant Death / diagnosis*,  pathology*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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