Document Detail


Recognizing exercise-related headache.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20086884     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Active patients may suffer not only from the common headache syndromes that plague the general population, but also from headache brought on by exercise. Valsalva-type maneuvers can bring on exertional headache; maximal or submaximal aerobic activity can precipitate effort headache. Trauma to the head and neck can lead to posttraumatic headache. Other headache syndromes in athletes include cervicogenic headache, goggle headache, diver's headache, and altitude headache.
Authors:
P McCrory
Related Documents :
7726784 - Nathan zuntz (1847-1920)--a german pioneer in high altitude physiology and aviation med...
7930984 - Ecg in sickle cell trait at rest and during exercise and hypoxia.
9587844 - The effect of altitude on radial keratotomy.
12969814 - Effect of altitude on second-generation blood tests to detect erythropoietin abuse by a...
11689734 - Stroke volume does not plateau during graded exercise in elite male distance runners.
18004114 - Use of ischemia-modified albumin in diagnosis of coronary artery disease.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Physician and sportsmedicine     Volume:  25     ISSN:  0091-3847     ISO Abbreviation:  Phys Sportsmed     Publication Date:  1997 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-01-20     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0427461     Medline TA:  Phys Sportsmed     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  33-43     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Olympic Park Sports Medicine Centre, East Melbourne, Australia, VIC 3002, AUS.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Joint pain and swelling: could it be lyme arthritis?
Next Document:  Strength training: rationale for current guidelines for adult fitness programs.