Document Detail


Rapid infant weight gain and advanced skeletal maturation in childhood.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  19446851     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that rapid infant weight gain is associated with advanced skeletal maturity in children from the United States and South Africa.
STUDY DESIGN: Longitudinal data from 467 appropriate-for-gestational-age infants in the Fels Longitudinal Growth Study (Dayton, Ohio) and 196 appropriate-for-gestational-age infants in the Birth to Twenty birth cohort study (Johannesburg, South Africa) were used. Multiple linear regression models tested the association between internal SD score change in weight from 0 to 2 years and relative skeletal age at 9 years, adjusting for body mass index, stature, and other covariates.
RESULTS: In both studies, faster infant weight gain was associated with more advanced skeletal maturity (approximately 0.2 years or 2.4 months per SD score) at age 9 years (P <.0001-.005), even when adjusting for the positive associations of both birth weight and body mass index at age 9 years. This effect appeared to be accounted for by the greater childhood stature of subjects with more rapid infant weight gain.
CONCLUSIONS: Relatively rapid infant weight-gain is associated with advanced skeletal development in late childhood, perhaps via effects on stature.
Authors:
Ellen W Demerath; Laura L Jones; Nicola L Hawley; Shane A Norris; John M Pettifor; Dana Duren; W Cameron Chumlea; Bradford Towne; Noel Cameron
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2009-05-15
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Journal of pediatrics     Volume:  155     ISSN:  1097-6833     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Pediatr.     Publication Date:  2009 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2009-09-07     Completed Date:  2009-09-30     Revised Date:  2014-03-19    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0375410     Medline TA:  J Pediatr     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  355-61     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Age Factors
Birth Weight
Body Mass Index
Body Size
Bone Development / physiology*
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
South Africa
United States
Weight Gain / physiology*
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
R01 HD012252/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R01 HD053685-03/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R01-HD12252/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R01-HD53685/HD/NICHD NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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