Document Detail


Rapid drinking is associated with increases in driving-related risk-taking.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23027650     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: The rate of alcohol drinking has been shown to predict impairment on cognitive and behavioral tasks. The current study assessed the influence of speed of alcohol consumption within a laboratory-administered binge on self-reported attitudes toward driving and simulated driving ability.
METHOD: Forty moderate drinkers (20 female, 20 male) were recruited from the local community via advertisements for individuals who drank alcohol at least once per month. The equivalent of four standard alcohol drinks was consumed at the participant's desired pace within 2-h session.
RESULTS: Correlation analyses revealed that, after alcohol drinking, mean simulated driving speed, time in excess of speed limit, collisions, and reported confidence in driving were all associated with rapid alcohol drinking.
CONCLUSION: Fast drinking may coincide with increased driving confidence because of the extended latency between the conclusion of drinking and the commencement of driving. However, this latency did not reduce alcohol-related driving impairment, as fast drinking was also associated with risky driving.
Authors:
Kimberly A Bernosky-Smith; Elizabeth R Aston; Anthony Liguori
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2012-10-02
Journal Detail:
Title:  Human psychopharmacology     Volume:  27     ISSN:  1099-1077     ISO Abbreviation:  Hum Psychopharmacol     Publication Date:  2012 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-11-06     Completed Date:  2014-01-21     Revised Date:  2014-02-24    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8702539     Medline TA:  Hum Psychopharmacol     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  622-5     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Automobile Driving / psychology*
Binge Drinking / psychology*
Female
Humans
Male
North Carolina
Risk-Taking*
Time Factors
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
P01 AA017056/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS; P01 AA17056/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS; T32 AA007565/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS; T32 AA07565/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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