Document Detail


Randomized trial of a video-based patient decision aid for bariatric surgery.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21475138     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The decision to have bariatric surgery should be based on accurate information on possible risks and benefits of all treatment options. The goal of this study was to determine whether a video-based bariatric decision aid intervention results in superior decision quality compared to an educational booklet. We conducted a prospective, randomized controlled trial among adult patients in a single health plan who met standard criteria for bariatric surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to review either a video-based decision aid (intervention) or an educational booklet on bariatric surgery (control). Changes in patient decision quality were assessed using bariatric-specific measures of knowledge, values, and treatment preference after 3 months. Of 152 eligible participants, 75 were randomly assigned to the intervention and 77 to the control. The 3-month follow-up rate was 95%. Among all participants, significant improvements were observed in knowledge (P < 0.001), values concordance (P = 0.009), decisional conflict (P < 0.001), decisional self-efficacy (P < 0.001), and in the proportion who were "unsure" of their treatment choice (P < 0.001). The intervention group had larger improvements in knowledge (P = 0.03), decisional conflict (P = 0.03), and outcome expectancies (P = 0.001). The proportion of participants choosing bariatric surgery did not differ significantly between groups, although there was a trend toward decreased surgical choice in the intervention group (59% booklet vs. 42% video at 3 months; P = 0.16). The use of bariatric surgery decision aids was followed by improved decision quality and reduced uncertainty about treatment at 3 months. The video-based decision aid appeared to have a greater impact than the educational booklet on patient knowledge, decisional conflict, and outcome expectancies.
Authors:
David E Arterburn; Emily O Westbrook; T Andy Bogart; Karen R Sepucha; Steven N Bock; William G Weppner
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2011-04-07
Journal Detail:
Title:  Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.)     Volume:  19     ISSN:  1930-739X     ISO Abbreviation:  Obesity (Silver Spring)     Publication Date:  2011 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-07-26     Completed Date:  2012-01-17     Revised Date:  2012-08-13    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101264860     Medline TA:  Obesity (Silver Spring)     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1669-75     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA. arterburn.d@ghc.org
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Bariatric Surgery*
Conflict (Psychology)
Decision Making*
Decision Support Techniques*
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pamphlets*
Patient Education as Topic / methods*
Patient Participation*
Patient Satisfaction
Self Efficacy
Social Values
Uncertainty
Videotape Recording*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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